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Women Of Design

March 08 2018
March 08 2018
FEmale Designers you should know (2)

Women's role in architecture and design is often overlooked. Today, in honor of International Women's Day, we take a look at some of the amazing women who have pioneered architecture and design.


Ray Eames

Ray Eames was one of the most iconic female designers in modern design history. Born and raised in Sacramento, Eames studied with the German Abstract Expressionist Hans Hofmann in New York City, and then continued her education at the Art Academy in Cranbrook, Michigan. Her husband and business partner, Charles Eames, said it all: “Anything I can do, Ray can do better”. The two worked hand in hand for many years and are famous for their groundbreaking contributions to architecture and furniture design, most notably, the Eames Lounge Chair.

Eileen Gray

The Irish architect and furniture designer Eileen Gray is a notable figure in the world of mid-century design. In addition to collaborating on the incredible E-1027 building in France, Gray designed the iconic Bibendum chair. The chair was well ahead of its time, exuding both feminine and modern design.

Charlotte Perriand

Studying furniture design in Paris, Charlotte applied for a position at Le Corbusier’s studio in 1927. After being rejected under the preconceived notion that she would only want to embroider cushions, Charlotte took things into her own hands. She created an exhibit featuring modern and edgy materials in her own rooftop apartment and invited Le Corbusier for a private viewing. This gutsy move impressed him and led to her eventually spending a decade working with him and a career that spanned a total of 75 years.

Lina Bo Bardi

Lina was born in Italy and then immigrated to Brazil in 1946 where she founded the magazine Habitat. She was to become one of the most important and expressive architects of 20th-century Brazilian architecture. In addition to being a top modernist female architect, Lina Bo Bardi also had an eye for designing funky minimalist furniture. In 1951 she built her personal residence, The Glass House. This structure became a symbol of modernism throughout Brazil.

Zaha Hadid

Born in Iraq and educated in London, Zaha Hadid was the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004 and the first woman to win a RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 2016. Zaha was known as the queen of curves in the architecture community because of her use of geometry and fluidity. Her office has worked on a total of 950 projects of various scales, operated in 44 countries, and boasted a staff of 400 from 55 countries.


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