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Air Purifying House Plants

November 06 2018
November 06 2018
Air Purifying House Plants
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Given that people spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, air quality is an important issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the air inside our homes can be more polluted than the air outdoors. In fact, the EPA has ranked Indoor air pollutants among the top five environmental risks to public health.

Common culprits of indoor toxins include cleaning products, air fresheners, and many household items, including mattresses, floors, furniture, and cosmetics. Indoor air pollution can also be caused by outdoor pollen, bacteria, molds, and things like car exhaust that find their way into our homes. For us in Northern California, the summer fires also created increased exposure to smoke particle pollution.

The good news is that there’s an easy, natural and affordable way to combat the presence of the yucky stuff we may be breathing in — houseplants!

Plants absorb some of the particulates from the air at the same time that they take in carbon dioxide, which is then processed into oxygen through photosynthesis. But that’s not all—microorganisms associated with the plants are present in the potting soil, and these microbes are also responsible for much of the cleaning effect .

Below are 7 NASA scientist approved household plants that can help clear airborne toxins.

Check out these NASA scientist-approved household plants for helping clear airborne toxins.
7 Plants That Can Actually Purify Your Indoor Air


Boston Fern

Palm Trees

Rubber Plants

English Ivy

Peace Lily

Golden Pothos

Mums and Gerbera Daisies



For even more info, you can read the entire NASA study here, and check out Lifehacker’s infographic detailing household chemicals and top plant here.


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